IFAS News

University of Florida

UF Research: Methyl Bromide More Effective, Economical For Killing Anthrax

Topic(s): Uncategorized

By:
Chuck Woods (352) 392-1773 x 281

Source(s):
Rudolf Scheffrahn rhsc@ufl.edu, (954) 577-6312
Mark Weinberg maw920@bellsouth.net, (954) 214-3133
Jeff Kempter kempter.carlton@epa.gov, (703) 305-5448

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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla.—As anthrax and other biological weapons continue to be worrisome threats, a University of Florida researcher has found a common pest control agent called methyl bromide is more effective and cheaper than current treatments in eradicating deadly bacterial spores from buildings.

“Tests indicate the fumigant – used for more than 50 years to control insect pests in buildings, grain elevators and fresh fruit – is a better option than current treatments such as chlorine dioxide for killing anthrax and other bacterial spores,” said Rudolf Scheffrahn, a professor of entomology with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, who has studied pest control fumigants for more than 15 years. (more …)

To Help Save Southern Heritage, UF Experts Help Develop New Crop Rotation System For Peanut, Cotton Farmers

Topic(s): Uncategorized

By:
Tom Nordlie (352) 392-1773 x 277

Source(s):
Jim Marois marois@mail.ifas.ufl.edu, (850) 875-7120
Dallas Hartzog dhartzog@acesag.auburn.edu, (334) 693-3800
John Baldwin jbaldwin@uga.edu, (229) 386-3430
David Wright dlw@mail.ifas.ufl.edu, (850) 875-7119
Wayne Reeves (334) 844-4666

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QUINCY, Fla. — Low profits are driving many small peanut and cotton farmers out of business in the Southeast, but University of Florida experts say the downward spiral could be halted — and some of the region’s heritage saved — if farmers adopt a “less-is-more” approach to farming.

By growing peanuts and cotton less often and growing pasture grass instead, farmers could increase peanut and cotton yields 50 to 100 percent, said Jim Marois, a plant pathology professor with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. (more …)

First UF Orchid Short Course March 23-24

Topic(s): Uncategorized

By:
Carolina Revilla-Vendrame (305) 246-7000

Source(s):
Terril Nell tnell@mail.ifas.ufl.edu, (352) 392-1829, ext. 377
Lisa Hall lhall@mail.ifas.ufl.edu, (352) 392-1831, ext. 333

GAINESVILLE, Fla.—Learn how to identify, cultivate and take care of orchids at the University of Florida’s first Orchid Production and Culture Short Course March 23-24.

Sponsored by the Boca Raton Orchid Society, the event is being organized by UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. (more …)

Cabbage Soup Diet No Lucky Charm For Weight Loss, Says UF Expert

Topic(s): Uncategorized

By:
Tom Nordlie (352) 392-1773 x 277

Source:
Elaine Turner ret@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu, (352) 392-1991 ext. 224

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GAINESVILLE, Fla. — No St. Patrick’s Day meal would be complete without cabbage. While the leafy vegetable is a nutritional pot o’ gold, it also is the centerpiece of a weeklong crash diet that’s mostly blarney, says a University of Florida dietary expert.

The “cabbage soup diet” promises users can lose 10 to 15 pounds in seven days by following a strict regimen that includes unlimited amounts of cabbage soup, but it’s no way to achieve permanent weight loss, said Elaine Turner, a nutritional scientist with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. (more …)

Native Plants Can Help Gardeners Save Water, Says UF Expert

Topic(s): Uncategorized

By:
Tom Nordlie (352) 392-1773 x 277

Source(s):
Sandy Wilson sbwilson@gnv.ifas.ufl.edu, (561) 468-3922 ext. 132
David Chiappini dchiapin@atlantic.net, (877) 352-2366
Robert Breunig pipho@wildflower.org, (512) 292-4200

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FORT PIERCE, Fla. — Gardeners in drought-prone Southeastern states may want to “go native” this spring and beautify yards with native plants requiring little irrigation, says a University of Florida horticulturalist.

“Plants that occur naturally in an ecosystem are adapted to the local temperature and rainfall patterns, so they generally require less maintenance,” said Sandy Wilson, an assistant professor of environmental horticulture with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. “They’ve also adapted to soil conditions and generally have fewer pest problems.” (more …)

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