IFAS News

University of Florida

UF/IFAS study: Pesticide-induced mosquito death outweighs fitness advantage of survivors

Topic(s): Entomology and Nematology, Environment, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Pests, RECs, Research, Safety

Larvicide - Aedes aegypti larva2 - photo courtesy Catherine Zettel Nalen, UF-IFAS 021216

Please see caption below

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A common toxin used to kill yellow fever mosquito larvae – the most prevalent transmitter of dengue, chikungunya and zika viruses – is highly effective. While there are some fitness advantages to surviving adults, this is still an effective way to control the damaging health impacts of these mosquito-borne diseases, a new University of Florida study shows.

Scientists and mosquito control officials want to kill mosquitoes during the larval, or juvenile stage, before they grow into adulthood and transmit these dangerous diseases. Dengue and chikungunya viruses are regarded as two of the most important mosquito-borne viral illnesses, said Barry Alto, a UF/IFAS assistant professor in entomology at the UF/IFAS Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory in Vero Beach, Florida.

The few mosquitos that do survive after exposure to the toxin gain a fitness advantage in adulthood, but their numbers are so small that their trait improvements, including enhanced size and ability to reproduce, are unlikely to outweigh the benefit of the rest of the mosquitoes that die from the pesticide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti), Alto said.

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UF/IFAS – saving the world one great idea at a time at ONE WORLD summit

Topic(s): Agriculture, CALS, Environment, Families and Consumers, IFAS

CALS Challenge 2050 One World event is being held at the UF auditorium on Friday, Feb 19th, 2016.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Today’s students will be the world’s leaders in 2050, when the population is expected to reach 9 billion people; they will face issues like overcrowding, food security, energy and water management, and climate change.

The second annual ONE WORLD summit at the University of Florida addresses these issues by bringing together a diverse group of educators and students, Extension professionals, community development personnel, corporate partners and policy makers. The day-long event will take place Feb. 19 in the University of Florida University Auditorium at 333 Newell Drive, beginning at 8:30 a.m. Everyone is encouraged to attend. (more …)

UF/IFAS scientists write document explaining Zika virus; urge vigilance

Topic(s): Entomology and Nematology, Extension, IFAS, Pests, RECs, Research

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Although the Zika virus is spreading, even into Florida, it does not appear to have been transmitted from mosquito to person or person to person in Florida. But that could happen any time, University of Florida scientists say. Thus, they urge everyone to stay alert.

“We should remain vigilant and informed,” said Jorge Rey, entomology professor and interim director of the Florida Medical Entomology Laboratory (FMEL) in Vero Beach, Florida, part of the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

Public concerns about Zika triggered UF/IFAS scientists to write a new Extension document to explain the virus. The paper can be found at http://bit.ly/1QTLDqO. FMEL scientists also have crafted a new question-and-answer document for their website, http://bit.ly/1O0eLbi.

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UF receives $6.7 million in federal funds to fight citrus greening

Topic(s): Agriculture, Announcements, Citrus, IFAS, RECs, Research

Small citrus trees infected with citrus greening.  Asian citrus psyllid, liberibacter asiaticum, greening, citrus disease, entomology.  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — The University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences received $6.7 million in funding as part of a $20.1 million grant for research on citrus greening, a disease devastating Florida’s citrus industry.

The United States Department of Agriculture awarded the grants to universities for research and Extension projects to help citrus producers fight citrus greening, also known as huanglongbing or HLB. This funding is available through the Specialty Crop Research Initiative’s Citrus Disease Research and Extension Program, which was authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill and is administered by USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

“Citrus greening has affected more than 75 percent of Florida citrus crops and threatens production all across the United States,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “The research and extension projects funded today bring us one step closer to providing growers real tools to fight this disease, from early detection to creating long-term solutions for the industry, producers and workers.” (more …)

UF/IFAS researchers in fight to keep Valentine’s Day rosy

Topic(s): Agriculture, Economics, Environment, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Invasive Species, Research

roses

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Roses are usually the flower of choice for Valentine’s Day, and researchers with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences want to keep it that way. Scientists are racing to develop a plan to prevent or treat rose rosette disease, which is decimating the rose industry in other states.

“Rose rosette is a devastating disease and one of the worst things to come along,” said Gary Knox, professor of environmental horticulture and Extension specialist in nursery crops. “So, we joined a multistate comprehensive project to find a management plan.”

The challenge is in detecting the virus before symptoms arrive, Knox said. “A nursery might not know it has the disease and sell rose plants to unsuspecting customers. Months later, the disease shows up,” he said. “The major issue is being able to detect the virus before it shows up.”

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UF/IFAS plant scientists try to breed a little cupid magic

Topic(s): Cultivars, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Lawn & Garden, RECs, Research

Dr. Zhanao Deng (center) showing FAES interns Mary Derrick (right) and Monica Raguckas the flowers of gerbera daisy to be used for hand pollination.  2009 Annual Research Report photo by Patty McClain.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Roses are red; violets are blue, and University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers are developing better breeds of Valentine’s Day plants just for you.

Here are just a couple of examples.

Zhanao Deng, a professor of environmental horticulture at the UF/IFAS Gulf Coast Research and Education Center in Balm, Florida, is breeding gerbera daisy cultivars that are resistant to powdery mildew, the most destructive fungal disease for this type of flower. Deng said his daisies are also becoming more attractive.

“These daisy cultivars can be used for cut flowers or potted plants,” he said.

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UF/IFAS encourages Floridians to take up beekeeping, hosting annual Bee College March 4-5

Topic(s): Agriculture, Entomology and Nematology, IFAS

Honey bees crawling across a bee hive during a Bee College demonstration on grafting.  Bees, beekeeping, pollinators, entomology.  UF/IFAS Photo by Tyler Jones.

DAVIE, Fla. — William Kern, an associate professor with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, gently pumped smoke into a beehive to calm the insects before he lifted the lid off the white box to gather wildflower honey.

“Beekeeping has many of the attributes that lead people into gardening: outdoor activity, intellectually interesting, relaxing – if you are doing it right – helpful to the environment by providing pollinators in areas where native bees have been lost or reduced in population,” said Kern. “And you can produce desirable commodities like honey, beeswax, pollen and propolis – or bee glue.”

Kern is one of UF’s most vocal bee enthusiasts and encourages everyone interested to get involved with beekeeping.  One way is to take classes at this year’s annual UF/IFAS Bee College, being held March 4th and 5th at the Whitney Marine Laboratory in Marineland, Fla.  (more …)

UF/IFAS to honor 3 faculty members for global work

Topic(s): Agriculture, Announcements, Honors and Appointments, IFAS

GAINESVILLE, Fla.— Recognizing their leadership in global agricultural affairs, the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences will honor three faculty members with the 2015 UF/IFAS International Awards. There ceremony will be held from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Feb. 11 in the Keene Faculty Center, Dauer Hall.

Gregory MacDonald, Robert McCleery and E. Vanessa Campoverde will be celebrated for their contributions to both UF/IFAS and the world.

“This is a great distinction and honor for each that reflects the global stature of their career accomplishments and the high esteem in which they are held not only here in UF/IFAS but also worldwide,” said Jack Payne, senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources.

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Reeling from citrus greening, UF/IFAS researchers support new olive industry in Florida

Topic(s): Agriculture, Crops, Economics, Entomology and Nematology, IFAS, Research

Extension

DELEON SPRINGS, Fla. – Richard Williams unfurls his long, sturdy frame from a tractor and begins a stroll through 20 acres of olive groves at his farm in Volusia County, Florida. His in-laws, the Ford/Veech family, has spent six generations farming in Florida, and has a more than 50-year-old citrus grove.

Williams checks the leaf structure to see which of the 11,160 olive trees are giving fruit. He has a lot riding on the Florida Olive Systems, Inc., project that is being funded by the Ford/Veech family.

“Planting olives is not for the faint of heart by any stretch of the imagination. This is so new that we are learning every day,” said Williams, whose wife Lisa helps run Florida Olive Systems, Inc. “But it’s a new opportunity to reinvent ourselves after catastrophic losses to citrus greening.”

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UF/IFAS study: “Green Industry” generates nearly $200 billion; 2 million jobs nationwide

Topic(s): Economics, Extension, Families and Consumers, Green Living, IFAS, Landscaping, Lawn & Garden, Research

Landscaped yards and homes in Florida.  Landscaping, plants, gardens, neighborhoods, communities, development.  UF/IFAS Photo: Tyler Jones.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — What economists call the “green industry” – nursery and greenhouse production, landscape services and horticultural product distribution − is bringing plenty of green to a lot of people across the country. A new study by the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences shows that the industry generated $196 billion in revenues annually, and more than two million jobs in the United States.

“Our study demonstrated that this industry is a very large employer,” said Alan Hodges, Extension scientist with the UF/IFAS food and resource economics department and lead author of the study. “It exists in virtually every community in the U.S. The rise of large retail chain stores with garden departments has made plants and other horticultural products more readily available to consumers than ever before.”

Green industry products include sod, flowers, bedding plants, tropical foliage, trees and shrubs, among other types of plants. The industry also includes many businesses that provide services such as landscape design, installation and maintenance, plus firms — such as lawn and garden stores — for wholesale and retail distribution of horticultural products, Hodges said.

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