IFAS News

University of Florida

Gardening as a child may lead college students to eat more veggies

Topic(s): Extension, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Nutrition, Research

Veggies Get Fruved 091216

Please see cutline below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — As researchers nationwide try to get college students to eat healthier foods, they’re finding that gardening may lead to a lasting habit of eating more fruits and vegetables.

That’s a recent conclusion from the “Get Fruved” project. “Get Fruved,” an acronym for “Get Your Fruits and Vegetables,” is a $4.9 million collaborative project among eight American universities, including the University of Florida. At UF, the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is leading the campus study. One of the first steps of the project is to better understand what factors predict and influence the health behaviors of college and high school students.

A new study from Get Fruved shows if college students gardened as a child or use their green thumbs now, chances are they will eat more fruits and vegetables than those who don’t.

“This finding is particularly relevant, given the recent popularity of school gardens and farm-to-school projects,” said Anne Mathews, a UF/IFAS assistant professor of food science and human nutrition and lead author of the study.

(more …)

UF/IFAS researcher wins grant to try to manipulate iron absorption in at-risk people

Topic(s): Families and Consumers, Food Safety, IFAS, Nutrition, Research

James Collins

James Collins

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — People with too much iron in their bodies can develop serious illnesses. So University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher James Collins plans to use a $2.5 million grant to begin to regulate iron absorption in the intestines.

Intestinal iron absorption is important because humans have no way to excrete excess iron. This inability to get rid of excess iron can create a condition known as “iron overload.” It can lead to cardiac issues, cancer, diabetes and a slew of other illnesses, Collins said.

People with genetic iron-overload disorders, or hemochromatosis, could eventually benefit from the research that Collins and his team will conduct.

(more …)

UF/IFAS Extension, Bok Tower Gardens team up for grand opening on Sept. 10

Topic(s): Announcements, Extension, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Nutrition

BOK TOWER GARDENS

LAKE WALES, Fla. – After months of construction, the successful conclusion of the “Preserve the Legacy, Steward the Future” capital campaign, and the active implementation  of a  new relationship, Bok Tower Gardens and the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences’ fruitful partnership comes into full bloom with the opening of several highly anticipated garden areas.

The grand opening celebration, on Saturday, Sept. 10, will feature the Pollinator Garden, Hammock Hollow Children’s Garden, Wild Garden, Outdoor Kitchen and Edible Garden. The Gardens will open at 8 a.m. and general admission will be free for this historic event.

“It has been a long journey since construction began in October 2014 and we are so excited to share these new Gardens with our visitors,” said Bok Tower Gardens president David Price. “This grand opening celebration salutes the work of our board, donors, members and staff who recognized this vision would lead to big improvements without changing the spirit of the Gardens.”

The celebration will begin at 10 a.m. with a special ribbon cutting dedication and remarks from Gardens’ president David Price, board of directors chair Cindy Alexander, board of directors vice chair Tomas Bok and Nick Place, dean and director of UF/IFAS Extension.

“This partnership between UF/IFAS Extension and Bok Tower Gardens not only helps us affect positive change in the community, but also make the world better,” Place said. “UF/IFAS Extension is dedicated to helping people connect with agriculture and natural resources, on which our survival and quality of life depends. We are thrilled to collaborate with Bok Tower Gardens to offer visitors new experiences and programming that do just that.”

(more …)

‘Nudges’ help students select healthy lunches

Topic(s): Extension, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Nutrition, Research

Kids in a school cafeteria to promote the My Plate and YUM nutrition programs.

Please see caption at end of story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — With back-to-school season in full swing, imagine this: Your child orders lunch via computer and gets a little message saying he or she needs to add more nutritious food groups. That combination helped some youngsters eat healthier meals, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study showed.

Researchers caution that their findings are not generalizable — given the small sample size — but they say the methods give school lunch programs and parents potential tools to help children eat more nutritious meals at school.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, more than 5 billion school lunches are served daily in the United States. Additionally, although 99.9 percent of American children aged 12 to 18 consume fruits and vegetables daily, less than 1 percent eat the federally recommended amount of those foods. So the UF/IFAS study could show helpful, albeit early, findings.

(more …)

UF/IFAS Extension Escambia County launches garden, nutrition program at community school

Topic(s): Extension, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Nutrition

garden1

Please see caption below story.

PENSACOLA, Fla. — As students at C.A. Weis Elementary School return for the new school year, they’ll notice something different about the area next to the outdoor space where physical education classes are usually held. Thanks to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension, students will find a new school garden that offers hands-on learning and strives to be a community gathering place.

“The school used to have a garden, but it fell into disuse, which is when we stepped in,” said Beth Bolles, horticulture agent with UF/IFAS Extension Escambia County, who co-organized outreach at C.A. Weis with Angela Hinkle, a UF/IFAS Extension Escambia County agent who specializes in the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP).

The project would not have been possible without the support of the school’s faculty and administration, the organizers said.

(more …)

‘Local food opinion leaders’ can help bridge gap between farmers, consumers

Topic(s): Agriculture, Economics, Extension, Families and Consumers, Food Safety, IFAS, Nutrition

Buying and selling at an outdoor farmers' market

Please see caption below story.
“GAINESVILLE, Fla. — As consumers increasingly desire local food, opinion leaders can encourage others to eat healthier food and, in doing so, improve the local economy, according to new University of Florida Food and Agricultural Sciences research.

“Opinion leaders” are those who influence others via the respect they earn from those around them, said Alexa Lamm, associate director of the UF Center for Public Issues Education (PIE Center) and the leader of this research.

“Opinion leaders could be critical in bridging the gap between locally grown food and consumers. That’s important because local food sales totaled $6.1 million in 2012, up $1.3 million in four years, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But another study showed only 7.8 percent of U.S. farms targeted local consumers.

(more …)

UF/IFAS scientists find top 10 muscadine grape varieties for health, taste, smell

Topic(s): Agriculture, Cultivars, Economics, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Nutrition, Research

Muscadine grapes 062915

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — You may eventually tempt your palette with more muscadine grape varieties, and they’ll be good for you, with new findings from University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers.

Muscadine grapes are known for their health benefits and other nutritive values – even for potential preventive measures against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The fruits are rich in antioxidants such as a ellagic acid and resveratrol.

Although scientists have done much research extracting and identifying these health benefits, the studies have looked at few commercial varieties. The new UF/IFAS study examined those benefits in 58 of the approximately 100 muscadine grape varieties.

UF/IFAS scientists, led by former post-doctoral researcher Changmou Xu, put the muscadine varieties through various tests over two growing seasons to see which ones passed muster for health, taste and smell genes.

(more …)

Nutrition survival tips for college students and avoiding weight gain

Topic(s): Extension, Families and Consumers, Nutrition

New Trans Fat info on labels.

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — When you get to college, and you’re trying to eat well, there are so many temptations and challenges — fast foods and late-night pizza, navigating the dining halls, limited transportation to grocery stores. For most college students, this is the first time living away from home. This new found independence is exciting, but comes with challenges, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher and UF/IFAS Extension specialist.

Poor nutrition habits can have a negative impact on health, body weight, and, behaviors formed during this initial period of independence can last a lifetime, said Anne Mathews, a UF/IFAS assistant professor of food science. While the so-called “Freshmen 15” is a bit of an exaggeration, most college students gain excess weight. On average, college students gain about 7 pounds during the first year, and many continue to gain weight at a slower rate throughout college.

Mathews works as an investigator on a national project that’s trying to get college students to live healthier lifestyles, says you can eat healthy meals in college just by paying attention to a few details.

(more …)

A UF/IFAS guide to eating healthy foods at school

Topic(s): Extension, Families and Consumers, IFAS, Nutrition

School cafeteria to promote the My Plate and YUM nutrition programs.

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Children have lots of food and beverage choices when they return to school this fall. Parents can take an active role in ensuring their children eat healthy foods at school, says a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher.

Also, some parents may be reassured by standards established by the federal government four years ago — the first major changes to school nutrition standards in 15 years, said Gail Kauwell, a UF/IFAS professor of food science and human nutrition.

Parents can encourage their children to eat good food at school, instead of throwing it out.

“Discussing the importance of fruits, vegetables, and proper nutrition with your child can help them understand the importance of eating their fruits and vegetables whether they are eating at home, school or somewhere else,” Kauwell said. “If you pack your child’s lunch, you can put a ‘fun twist’ on the fruits and vegetables. Making kabobs (place chunks of fruit and vegetables on skewers) or ‘bugs on a log’ (celery, cucumber, or carrot sticks (the ‘log’) topped with peanut butter and dried fruit (the ‘bugs’) are ways to make the fruits and vegetables more fun.”

(more …)

UF/IFAS study: Few people know mushrooms’ health benefits

Topic(s): Agriculture, Crops, Economics, Extension, Families and Consumers, Food Safety, IFAS, Nutrition, Research

 

Variety Mushrooms at the farmers market downtown union street market.

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Relatively few people are aware of the health benefits of mushrooms, according to a new national survey by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers.

Only 18.5 percent of survey respondents said they knew the health benefits of mushrooms, according to the online survey of 674 consumers.

“Potentially, increasing knowledge about health benefits would be useful to the mushroom industry,” said Lisa House, a UF/IFAS professor of food and resource economics and an investigator for the study.

Sue Percival, a UF/IFAS professor and chair of the department of food science and human nutrition and principal investigator for the study, published a study last year that documented how shiitake mushrooms can boost immunity. They’re also low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol-free, low in sodium, and they’re the leading source of the antioxidant selenium in the produce aisle, according to the National Mushroom Council.

The study, to be presented at a national conference next week, revealed many other clues about consumers’ mushroom-buying habits.

(more …)

Back to Top

windows-8-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-education-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-key windows-7-key windows-10-key windows-7-key windows-10-enterprise-key windows-8-product-key windows-8-key windows-7-key windows-7-key windows-7-key windows-8-key windows-7-product-key office-2010-key windows-7-key-sale windows-10-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-home-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-activation-key windows-8-key windows-7-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-7-key windows-7-product-key windows-7-key windows-7-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-key windows-7-product-key windows-8-key windows-7-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-key windows-10-pro-key windows-7-key office-2016-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-8-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-key windows-10-key windows-10-key windows-8-key windows-10-key windows-10-product-key windows-7-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-key windows-10-key windows-7-key windows-10-product-key office-2013-key windows-10-key windows-10-iso windows-7-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-8-key windows-7-key windows-8-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-key windows-8-key