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UF/IFAS names Calvin Arnold to lead Southwest Florida Research and Education Center

Topic(s): Announcements, RECs

arnold1

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Calvin Arnold, who led the Southwest Florida Research and Education Center for 10 years, will return to that post next month, UF’s Jack Payne, senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources, announced Tuesday.

“We are so fortunate to have Dr. Arnold back with UF/IFAS,” Payne said. “He is well- versed in the issues that are most critical for agricultural producers in that region, which is a huge advantage, and he’s a great leader, as well.”

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UF/IFAS researchers’ Extension paper honored

Topic(s): Agriculture, Announcements, Extension, IFAS, Research

David Diehl.  Family, Youth and Community Sciences. Glen IsraelAlexa Lamm.  AG-AG ED AND COMMUNICATION

Cutline: UF/IFAS faculty members co-wrote a paper that the Journal of Exention named as its Oustanding Feature for 2013. Pictured from left are co-authors David Diehl, an associate professor in the department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences; Glenn Israel, a professor of agricultural education and communication and Alexa Lamm, an assistant professor of agricultural education and communication and associate director of the Center for Public Issues Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources at UF. The reseach asked extension agents in eight states to report how they study and evaluate the long-term outcomes of their best programs.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Three University of Florida/IFAS researchers have been honored with the 2013 Outstanding Feature Award for their study, published in the Journal of Extension.

As part of its 50th anniversary, the journal recognized the article, “A National Perspective on the Current Evaluation Activities in Extension.”

Alexa Lamm, an assistant professor of agricultural education and communication and associate director of the Center for Public Issues Education in Agriculture and Natural Resources; Glenn Israel, a professor of agricultural education and communication and David Diehl, an associate professor in the department of Family, Youth and Community Sciences co-authored the paper.

The UF/IFAS study surveyed 1,173 county-based Extension agents in eight states ─ Florida, Arizona, Maine, Maryland, Montana, Nebraska, North Carolina and Wisconsin. Researchers asked the Extension professionals how they collect and report their evaluation data to measure short- and long-term outcomes while also evaluating their best Extension program.

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April 5 UF/IFAS Family Day at the Dairy Farm canceled

Topic(s): Uncategorized

Milking of dairy cows at the University of Florida's Dairy Research Unit Open House in Hague, Florida on April 30th, 2008.  Bos taurus, dairy cattle, milk, industry, DRU.  UF/IFAS Photo: Tyler Jones.

 

NOTE: THE APRIL 5 FAMILY DAY AT THE DAIRY FARM HAS BEEN CANCELED, DUE TO FLOODING IN THE VISITOR PARKING AREA. THE EVENT HAS NOT BEEN RESCHEDULED.

The University of Florida has postponed its open-house event, Family Day at the Dairy Farm, originally scheduled for Saturday, March 15.

Instead, the event will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 5, at the same location, the UF dairy farm in Hague.

Organizers with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences plan to issue a news release in early April confirming the new date.

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Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars adds two UF/IFAS members

Topic(s): Announcements, Uncategorized

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Two University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences faculty members are among the three named this year to UF’s Academy of Distinguished Teaching Scholars, which honors exceptional teaching and scholarship accomplishments.

The program inducts faculty members who have demonstrated sustained innovation and commitment in both areas.

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To the root of the matter – keeping nitrogen out of small streams

Topic(s): Aquaculture, Conservation, IFAS, Pollution, Research

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Feb. 25, 2014

GAINESVLLE, Fla. – For years, scientists tried to find out why some small streams carry only minute concentrations of nitrogen.

Now Stefan Gerber, a University of Florida researcher with the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, and Jack Brookshire, an assistant professor of biogeochemistry from Montana State University, believe they have solved the mystery. (more …)

Healthier processed food? Essence of strawberry could be the key

Topic(s): Cultivars, Research, Uncategorized

Festival 01

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida scientists believe they have pinpointed the exact compounds in strawberries that give the fruit its delightfully unique flavor – findings that will allow UF breeders to create more flavorful varieties even faster.

What’s more, the researchers believe that eventually, those naturally occurring compounds will be used to make processed foods taste sweeter, using far less sugar and no artificial sweeteners. And if fruits and vegetables taste better, people will be more likely to eat them, the researchers say.

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UF/IFAS research demonstrates improved appeal of crop-saving sterile flies

Topic(s): Uncategorized

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Caption at bottom.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Irradiated, sterile flies dropped over seaports and agricultural areas to mate with unsuspecting females save food crops and millions of dollars in prevented infestations and the ensuing eradication efforts.

But blasting these secret-suitor insects with radiation via electron beams, X-rays or gamma-rays, tends to make them weaker than typical males — and not so appealing to females as possible mates.

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UF/IFAS study: Computer model can help coastal managers with nourishment decisions

Topic(s): Agriculture, Disaster Preparedness, Environment, Research

beach erosion

Cutline: UF/IFAS researchers say a new computer model can help coastal managers make better beach nourishment decisions and possibly save millions of dollars. Above, the beach is shown with a fence at St. Augustine Beach, Fla.

UF/IFAS file photo

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – A computer model developed, in part, by University of Florida researchers can help coastal managers better understand the long-term effects of major storms, sea-level rise and beach restoration activities and possibly save millions of dollars.

Researchers used erosion data following tropical storms and hurricanes that hit Santa Rosa Island, off Florida’s Panhandle, and sea-level rise projections to predict beach habitat changes over the next 90 years. But they say their model can be used to inform nourishment decisions at any beach.

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UF/IFAS faculty member coordinates global pest paper contest

Topic(s): Agriculture, Household Pests, Pests
Jiri Hulcr, a University of Florida assistant professor of forest entomology, coordinates a global contest that encourages students to write original research papers about insects as pests. Courtesy: Jiri Hulcr

Jiri Hulcr, a University of Florida assistant professor of forest entomology, coordinates a global contest that encourages students to write original research papers about insects as pests.
Courtesy: Jiri Hulcr

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – A University of Florida entomology faculty member coordinates a global contest for students’ original insect research, and he recently announced the two winners for 2013.

The contest encourages students to research the natural history of pests, said Jiri Hulcr, a UF assistant professor in forest entomology and a member of UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

For their research papers, Stephen Taerum, who attends the University of Pretoria in South Africa and Emily Meineke, a student at North Carolina State University, won the most recent contest, now in its second year, said. For winning, they shared the annual prize of  $500.

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UF/IFAS approves 14 new cultivars for release

Topic(s): Agriculture, Citrus, Crops, Cultivars

 

Shown is coleus cultivar UF12-86-91, recently approved by a UF/IFAS committee. The panel recently approved 13 other cultivars -- in coleus and citrus --  for release.

Shown is coleus cultivar UF12-86-91, recently approved by a UF/IFAS committee. The panel recently approved 13 other cultivars — in coleus and citrus — for release.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Fourteen new cultivars, including eight coleus varieties and six citrus, have been approved for release by the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

Coleus are used as decorative bedding plants for landscaping, in mixed containers and as indoor potted plants in homes and gardens in North America and throughout the world. They are versatile, consumer-friendly plants because they are easy to grow in sun and shade and require less maintenance than many other garden plants, said David Clark, professor in floriculture and biotechnology, who developed the new cultivars.

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