IFAS News

University of Florida

Honor Earth Day by cutting food waste, UF/IFAS expert says

Topic(s): Environment, Families and Consumers, Green Living

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — This Earth Day — April 22 — you don’t have to leave your kitchen to start living more sustainably, says an expert with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension.

Consumers can help the environment by taking a closer look at the food they throw away, said Heidi Copeland, family and consumer sciences agent with UF/IFAS Extension Leon County.

“A surprising amount of food produced in the United States — between 30 to 40 percent — goes uneaten. It takes energy, water and farmland to grow, transport and store food, so wasted food translates into wasted natural resources,” Copeland said.

For consumers, wasted food also means wasted dollars, Copeland said.

According to a survey by the UF/IFAS Center for Public Issues Education, 60 percent of Floridians are concerned or extremely concerned about food waste in their home, with fresh fruits, vegetables and dairy products being the most common type of wasted food.

(more …)

UF workshop to help homeowners navigate HOA issues for landscaping

Topic(s): Announcements, Conservation, Environment, Extension, Florida Friendly, Green Living, IFAS, Landscaping, Lawn & Garden, Plants, Vegetables

Landscaping at a home garden.

SANFORD, Fla. — Wondering if that new lawn will mean a discussion with your Homeowner’s Association? The University of Florida Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM  program offers a workshop on April 26 to help homeowners navigate the process.

“Legally Speaking: FFL in The Planned Community” will run from 12:45 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the UF/IFAS Extension Seminole County office. The location is 250 County Home Road, Sanford, Florida 32773.

“We are offering the course to help homeowners learn about current legal issues, and to give them strategies they can use when working with an HOA board to install a Florida-Friendly landscape,” said Claire Lewis, UF/IFAS statewide Florida yards and neighborhoods coordinator. “We want homeowners and HOA members to work together and also be able to avoid problems by learning the science-based ways to landscape.”

The workshop will include topics such as a review of issues and outcomes of installing a Florida Friendly landscape, a presentation by a community association attorney on disputes arising between HOAs and homeowners, and 10 strategies for working with an HOA.

Cost to attend is $5. Click here to register. For more information, contact Claire Lewis at clairelewis@ufl.edu or 352-273-4518.

-30-

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu

UF/IFAS Milton Campus, Pensacola State College to host Spring Festival of Flowers on April 7-9

Topic(s): Agriculture, Cultivars, Extension, Families and Consumers, Green Living, IFAS, Plants, RECs

MILTON, Fla. — The seasons are changing and it’s time to enjoy the blooming plants across the state. Families are invited to enjoy the Spring Festival of Flowers on April 7 to 9 in Milton. The University of Florida IFAS Milton Campus and the Pensacola State College are sponsoring the free event.

The festival will be held at the UF/IFAS and Pensacola State College Milton Campus, 5988 Hwy. 90, Building 4900, Milton, Florida 32583. The festival hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.

The festival will feature arts and crafts, plants, flower and herbs, garden supplies, locally grown vegetables, and great food and music. Educational booths will feature UF/IFAS Extension agents answering questions about plants and flowers, eclectic gardening, good bugs and bad bugs, sprinklers and air layering demonstrations, and experts offering advice and hands-on demonstrations on wildlife for your backyard.

(more …)

‘Gloom’ and doom when these insects are on hot, dry red maple trees

Topic(s): Economics, Entomology and Nematology, Environment, Extension, Forestry, Green Living, IFAS, Landscaping, Pests, Research

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — They are known as gloomy scales, and these insects can make a red maple tree’s life downright dreary. This is because the arthropods feed and thrive on them, especially in warm and dry urban landscapes, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says.

Melanaspis tenebricosa, or gloomy scale insects, reproduce more, especially when the trees they live on are under the stress of heat and drought, according to new study led by UF/IFAS entomology assistant professor Adam Dale.

Dale’s new research is important as residents and urban landscapers decide when and where to plant red maple trees, which are native and widely distributed in North America from Florida to Canada and whose canopy helps cool urban areas.

(more …)

Faculty to share helpful information at UF/IFAS Urban Landscape Summit

Topic(s): Environment, Extension, Florida Friendly, Green Living, Landscaping, Lawn & Garden

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Protecting the water Floridians will need for the 15 million additional residents projected to live here 50 years from now means getting today’s 20 million Floridians to conserve water, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says.

Michael Dukes, a UF/IFAS professor of agricultural and biological engineering, said water conservation will be one of many topics at this year’s UF/IFAS Urban Landscape Conference, scheduled for March 16-17 at the Straughn Center, 2142 Shealy Drive, Gainesville.

UF/IFAS experts will share information on landscaping and the issues that go along with it, such as water, horticulture and human behavior, said Dukes, who also works as director of the UF/IFAS Center for Landscape Conservation and Ecology.

(more …)

UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Topic(s): Agriculture, Crops, Environment, Families and Consumers, Green Living, IFAS, Nutrition, RECs

JAY, Fla. — Do you know where your grits come from? Now, you can buy locally grown grits and cornmeal, and even visit the farm where the corn is grown.

The University of Florida IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center near Jay, Florida, is selling grits and cornmeal from corn grown and ground on its farm. The Gator Grind products are processed at the UF/IFAS West Florida REC and packaged for consumers there.

“We grow the corn, harvest it, put in the grain bin, clean it and grind it in a stone grist mill,” said Wes Wood, center director. “Visitors can come out to the UF/IFAS West Florida REC for one of our field days and see how grits and cornmeal are produced.”

Faculty at the UF/IFAS West Florida REC have been researching corn for decades, Wood said. These scientists conduct trials to determine the best corn varieties for the region, along with optimization of management variables such as soil fertility and pest control, he said.

“We conduct research that helps farmers grow the best crop possible under Florida Panhandle conditions,” Wood said.

(more …)

UF/IFAS offers tips on how to care for Valentine’s Day flowers

Topic(s): Agriculture, Cultivars, Environment, Extension, Families and Consumers, Green Living, IFAS

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — So you have received a bouquet of flowers for Valentine’s Day and want to keep them alive as long as possible. An expert with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences is here to help.

“The trick is to keep the water clean of fungus and bacteria so the flowers can stay fresh longer,” said Wendy Wilber, UF/IFAS State Master Gardener Coordinator. Also, Wilber recommends:

  • Once you’ve brought your flowers inside, remove any leaves or blossoms that will end up underwater. Then, cut one-half to one inch off the stems with a sharp, clean knife.
  • Place the flowers in a clean vase filled with fresh water and, if you have it, flower preservatives. Do not add sugar, as it will bring bacteria and clog the stems.
  • If the water turns yellow and cloudy, wash the vase with soapy water and add fresh water with flower preservatives.
  • Re-cut and rinse the stems before placing them back into the container.
  • Keep the flowers away from heating and air-conditioning vents, and from direct sunlight.

“Fresh flowers bring beauty and vitality into your home or office,” Wilber said. “Make the most out of the gift by keeping them fresh and beautiful for as long as possible.”

For more information on how to care for cut flowers, watch this video or visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NM1jBVFlDVo.

-30-

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu

 

Homeowners prefer property value boost brought about by city trees

Topic(s): Extension, Forestry, Green Living, IFAS, Research

 

planting live oak trees, 4-H, shovel, teenage girl. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Please see caption below the story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — If a city plants trees near a residential area, most homeowners value the likely subsequent boost to their property values, a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows.

And they’re willing to pay an average of $7 more per month in taxes for public trees planted in their city.

In the UF/IFAS study, 1,052 surveyed Florida homeowners said they’d like the trees on their land to provide shade and to be healthy, but they’d prefer an increase of $1,600 in their home’s value.

Residents were separated into two surveys. One asked them to consider a hypothetical home improvement project to better the trees on their property, while the other asked a similar referendum question regarding a city program that would increase their utility tax to increase urban forests in public areas near their homes. There were 526 responses to each survey.

(more …)

UF/IFAS researchers to present findings on critical ecosystem habitats at international conference

Topic(s): Aquaculture, Conservation, Environment, Green Living, IFAS, Research, Soil and Water Science

Mangrove tunnels at Weedon Island Preserve in Pinellas County, Florida.

Please see caption below story.

ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. — Two University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers will be among those presenting new data at a conference addressing mangrove ecosystems, which are critical for many things, including seafood habitat and erosion prevention.

Todd Osborne and Rupesh Bhomia, both with the UF/IFAS soil and water sciences department, will make presentations at the Mangrove Macrobenthos Meeting in St. Augustine, Florida, July 18 to July 22. This is the fourth meeting of these global mangrove experts and the first time it’s being held in the United States.

“We chose to have it in St. Augustine because we felt a lot of the mangrove research community would appreciate seeing this area of expansion of mangroves into the marshy habitats,” said Osborne, an assistant professor who works at UF’s Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience in St. Augustine, and a co-host of the conference.

(more …)

UF/IFAS researchers to study how to reduce carbon dioxide in ranch soil

Topic(s): Agriculture, Announcements, Conservation, Environment, Green Living, IFAS, Livestock, Research, Soil and Water Science

A herd of beef cattle on a Florida ranch, trees, cows, grass. UF/IFAS Photo: Thomas Wright.

Please see caption below story.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers hope to reduce possible pollutants emanating from soils in Florida cattle ranches by using a $710,000 federal grant to study soil microbes.

In the new study, UF/IFAS researchers will use lab and field studies to investigate how pasture management and factors such as temperature and rainfall affect soil microbes. They’ll also look for genetic markers to get a glimpse into microbial identity. Genetic markers are genes or short sequences of DNA scientists use to find other genes on a genetic map.

“The goal is to put together a model that can predict the release of greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide from soils under a climate that is expected to be warmer and experience more extreme dry and wet periods across the Southeast,” said Stefan Gerber, a UF/IFAS assistant professor in soil and water sciences and one of the investigators on the new study.

(more …)

Back to Top

windows-8-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-education-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-key windows-7-key windows-10-key windows-7-key windows-10-enterprise-key windows-8-product-key windows-8-key windows-7-key windows-7-key windows-7-key windows-8-key windows-7-product-key office-2010-key windows-7-key-sale windows-10-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-home-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-activation-key windows-8-key windows-7-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-7-key windows-7-product-key windows-7-key windows-7-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-key windows-7-product-key windows-8-key windows-7-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-key windows-10-pro-key windows-7-key office-2016-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-8-key windows-8-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-product-key windows-8-key windows-10-key windows-10-key windows-8-key windows-10-key windows-10-product-key windows-7-key windows-7-product-key windows-10-key windows-10-key windows-7-key windows-10-product-key office-2013-key windows-10-key windows-10-iso windows-7-product-key windows-8-product-key windows-7-product-key windows-8-key windows-7-key windows-8-key windows-10-product-key windows-10-key windows-8-key